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want to state we're not here trying to undermine funding for sandy, needed for sandy. some of the things the house did i think are legitimate in terms of saying let's set aside unrelated matters. it doesn't mean we cast them into the dust bin never to be seen again. it simply means let's let those that are not emergency situations be more carefully examined in terms of whether we need that. and if someone does come to the floor, as senator lee is going to do, is my understanding, and offers a potential offset, let's at least look at that possibility. the debt clock is ticking and ticking ever faster. and it is destroying the hopes and dreams of future generations. and i think we have a moral responsibility to at least be as conscious and effective with dealing with the taxpayers' dollars in terms of how they're spent, whether it's an emergency supplemental related to a disaster or whether it's just a normal appropriation that comes along every year through our appropriations process. we haven't exercised that kind of discipline, and our country is going to pay a very seriou
with 64 votes. we passed the hurricane sandy emergency relief bill also in bipartisan fashion, with 62 votes. we had open debate, we had discussions, we had amendments, and we passed legislation. particularly we passed by a powerful bipartisan vote of 89-8, a bill that avoided tax increases for 99% of americans and extended emergency unemployment benefits for another year and protected us from the fiscal cliff. when it comes to legislating, the senate actually has a pretty strong bipartisan record. how did those senate bills do on the house side? well, the house couldn't pass its own highway bill. congress has been doing highway bills since the eisenhower years. this isn't rocket science. the house couldn't do one. the best the house of representatives could do was to pass a short-term extension that allowed some of their members to get to conference on the senate bill. but they took no bill into conference because they couldn't pass one. even then they delayed the conference negotiations and they cost the united states of america an entire summer construction season for highway constr
. the majority leader. mr. reid: we're going to have one more vote tonight. the next vote will be on sandy and matters related to sandy monday night at 5:30. we expect -- i have spoken to the chairman, new chairman of the -- will soon be the chair of the foreign relations committee, and ranking member corker. we're going to have a vote after the business meeting sometime on tuesday on the new secretary of state. the presiding officer: the question is on senate resolution 16. are the yeas and nays requested? the yeas and nays have been requested. is there a sufficient second? there is a sufficient second. the clerk will call the roll. vote: the presiding officer: are will any senators in the chairman per wishing to vote or wishing to change their vote? if not, on this vote, the yeas are 86 and the nays are 9. two-thirds of those voting for adoption having voted in the affirmative and the resolution is agreed to. [inaudible] the presiding officer: without objection. vote: the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: i ask unanimous consent the senate proceed to a period of morning b
year which also provided much-needed relief funds for hurricane sandy victims. that was a bipartisan bill. it was supported by senate republicans and democrats alike. but the republicans in the house regrettably gutted the bill and sent back legislation that explicitly cut out wildfire relief. in that context, let me make one point absolutely clear. this is an emergency. some people have questioned the need for funding and have asked why we wouldn't limit dollars to just hurricane sandy saer kwras like the bill -- hurricane sandy areas. the short answer is it is the fiscally smart thing to do, the right thing to do, and the fair thing to do. this bill is an emergency appropriations bill for all national disasters, not just hurricane sandy. it is our best hope of seeing wildfire relief. i emphatically note that the colorado emergencies occurred before hurricane sandy and the west should not have to continue to wait. very few emergency supplemental bills pass congress. this bill is passing now, and it should include aid for colorado and other states across our country. we as americans,
politeness that i am still scheerer. [laughter] i sort of feel like the rest of the sandy koufax pitching staff. [laughter] but i did have the privilege to know jack well over several perspectives. i started even more green with the land the constitution when i was 21 years old, 1969. jack, he started when he was 23 years old, 1952. the dates are interesting the book is called the evolution of a southern reporter" evolution is the important part. jack was 23 years old. at 29 he won the pulitzer prize. and in 75 went to the "l.a. times." 1970 went to washington. young man. 65. 65, 70. he was a young man. he accomplished those wonderful stories but when i arrived he was still in into and still based their budget traveling all over with the movement at the time. those were not racially based. and this i learned from the book frankly the last door a jack covered for the constitution was in little rock when eisenhower in the federal troops and their desegregating central high school. as jean patterson said at the memorial service coverage jack was never deceived have a shot -- the same after t
this discussion, i'll just tell you one very personal anecdote. three days before the sandy hook shooting, i was in denver, colorado, on personal business. and i was driving through the denver suburbs, and i passed into aurora rah, colorado, and saw the sign and thought to myself -- as journalists often do -- oh, my god, this just disappeared from our landscape. it happened not that long ago in which a young man, now appears to be utterly deranged, b went into a movie theater and began shooting down people with an assault weapon. and it went away. the not part of the presidential debate, it was not part of the fabric of our lives, it was not part of the daily journalistic diet. so on that wednesday night i e-mailed the producer of the "meet the press" show that was coming up on that sunday in which they would be talking about big ideas that america needs to be thinking about. and i said you should put shooting at the top of the list. we have been through aurora, the sikh temple, the oregon shopping mall, think about this, this is before we got to sandy hook. in newtown. we'd had a time of ab
events. sunday as health issues sandy one to find the diagnosis or prognosis you can find health-related policy. my hope is that people will attend to different points of view. number two, the larger information provides opportunities when you accidentally bumped into relevant information. >> bruce williams at the university of virginia media studies program we went to graduate school together bruce and i have been working on this with the first discussion to write something on this topic 20 years ago when he noticed the changes. >> host: of what are you most excited of news dissemination? >> it is the opportunity for voices outside the media agenda to be able to be heard. the greatest most recent example is what role it plays is the era of spring. no doubt that was generated by years of concern of political freedom, economic concern that the ability for the spread is the direct result of the ability of people of mobile technology to share ideas and thoughts city going journalists had don't access there was information coming that juror attention to issues. that happens all the t
hurricane sandy relief package is manned for 5:30. and tomorrow senators will take up the confirmation vote of the nomination of massachusetts senator john kerry to be the next secretary of state. live coverage here on c-span the. c-span2. a bipartisan group of senators today will unveil immigration proposals at a news conference at 2:30 eastern with live coverage on c-span. this is ahead of a speech president obama will give on immigration policy tomorrow in las vegas. and wanted to tell you a little bit more about some of the new members of the 113th congress from massachusetts. democratic elizabeth warren, who defeated incumbent senator scott brown, was an early advocate for the formation of the consumer financial protection bureau and is the first woman to represent massachusetts in the senate. over in the house, joseph kennedy will represent the state's 4th district. he's the grandson of former u.s. attorney general and presidential nominee robert f. kennedy. ♪ ♪ >> if we turn away from the needs of others, we align ourselves with those forces which are bringing about this sufferin
be comparable to hurricane katrina were super storm sandy. i'm going to do whatever it can to make sure that doesn't happen. my proposed plant is two tunnels 30 miles long and 40 feet wide designed to improve the ecology of adults with almost 100 square miles of habitat restoration. yes that's big, but so is the problem. the olympics lasted a short while cost 14 million from the same cost project. this project will serve californians for hundreds of years. when you think about california's future, no long-term liability presents its greater danger to our well-being as the buildup of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. the latest report from the world think, carbon dioxide emissions are the highest in 15 million years. the planet could warm by more than seven degrees fahrenheit by the end of the century, an event unknown in human experience. some of you will be around for that. i won't. california is extremely vulnerable because of our mediterranean climate, one cosigned in reliance for so much of our water supply. tipping points can be reached before we know we
sandy relief efforts. we'll have live coverage of the senate when they return at 2:15 eastern here on c-span2. going to take you live next acrosstown in washington to the democratic national committee and their winter meeting about to get underway. they're going to hear from democratic national committee chairman, debbie debbie wasserman schultz. it should get underway shortly here on c-span2. democratic national committee chairman debbie wasserman schultz will speak shortly talking about the democratic party's agenda and challenges ahead for the 113th congress. we'll have live coverage when she gets underway on c-span2. a look at the agenda ahead in transportics with secretary ray a are hood who called on congress to pass a five-year long-term transportation bill. [applause] >> hello, everybody. thank you very much. good noontime to all of you and thank you for including me again in your program. i want to ask all of our dot team gathered for lunch to stand up and be recognized. all dot stand up and be recognized. [applause] thank you all. thank you. i know that trb wouldn't be what it
to boehner's defense when he delayed the vote on the sandy, because i said, 64% of that will never be spent for two years. it wasn't for the sandy victims. the budget control act says you cannot put money into the budget without taking something out. but a relief act is not subject to budget control, so the administration dumped on all these things. $15 million to plant tree on private property, 5-point' p billion for army corps of engineers which is in excess of their entire annual budget with no idea where it's going to be spend. mitigating future disasters? so a fact only a small portion of that actually went to sandy victims. what was an example of a profile in courage. why could dewant to put all this pork on here and make the american enemy spend money where we're in a deep hole and that's getting back to, how do we help president obama not become the president that bankrupted america? we have to cut expenses and if we went went around the table and within through the budget, there's many, many things that each of us would not bore roy money from china if they were still lehning it --
happy during sandy. we are able to do things to raise through covenant house and the cooperation of extorting people that went into raised a lot of money, because it actually doesn't take that much money to give a person or doorway of hope. and the last thing i will say on this is, you know, for me i get very upset because when i first became mayor i had a metaphor that i clung to. i used to tell people such an optimistic hopeful person companies to tell people i'm a prisoner of hope. when we walked into city hall seven years ago there were so many challenges and i would try to gird my team up and say we are prisoners of hope. we do nothing but hope. now seven years later my metaphor seems to have changed because i see powerfully transforming things -- happening from the largest parks expansion in century from a down housing market, to double the production of affordable housing, first time in 60 years the populace is going down, it's going up. hotels in downtown and 40 years. so my metaphor has changed and i tell people i'm no longer a prisoner of hope. i am unhinged because i n
that many of these issues ochered. they occur here in a different way after hurricane sandy i paid very close attention to the news. you saw a lot of the same thing this. with in the wake of the storm there would be a wave of panic and society would break down and mob mentality would break down. disaster relief officials were looking for any sign they could find with society breaking down with those voters and usually blowing it out of proportion there were isolated incidents but it was not take deal but it had major ramifications but talk about in the said nora libyans -- citizens of new orleans getting shot because the police assumed they were stealing. it would be nice if there was a period of reflection for disaster relief going forward with the haitian earthquake hit could have been implemented but it is no surprise it did not take place before but it is never too late and a period of reflection now would be a good time. >> three questions. number one, what do you think of the current president? what you think should have happened to those who returned to haiti? what about raw eart
change, and unimaginable human tragedies like sandy hook elementary. but we also bear witness to rapid breakthroughs in technology, medicine, and the fundamental understanding of our universe. every day i am left in awe at how much we are able to achieve, and heartbroken over the tragedies that we have had to endure. we truly live in extraordinary times. we also live in an extraordinary state, filled with extraordinary people. where the world sees uncertainty, we washingtonians see opportunity. and we all feel a profound responsibility to our children and our grandchildren. we have a spirit of innovation here in washington that has changed the world, from aerospace to software to e-commerce. and you know what? we are not done. [applause] a new world economy is emerging from the depths of this recession, and while its contours and relationships are not fully understood to us, we do know two things. first, with our uniquely powerful fusion of values and talents, washington state has the potential to lead the next wave of world-changing innovations. second, the world will not wait for us.
to make whole the victims of hurricane sandy. each of these initiatives passed the senate on a bipartisan basis but was left to languish by the house. the senate will continue to help our fellow americans to help with hurricane sandy before another similar disaster strikes. hundreds of thousands of homes and businesses were destroyed in new york, new jersey and new england and tens of thousands of americans were left homeless by this destructive storm. we have a responsibility to aid our country men as they rebuild their lives and communities as we have after terrible floods, fires and storms in other parts of our nation. once we complete that vital legislation, the senate will take action to make this institution that we all love -- the united states senate -- work more effectively. we'll consider changes in the senate rules. because of this -- because this matter warrants additional debate, we will follow the precedent set in 2005 and again in 2011 to reserve the right of all senators to propose changes in the senate rules and we will explicitly not act in acquiescing in carrying out al
see what happened in that tragedy at the sandy hook elementary school why were people moved by those children being hurt? >> guest: why aren't white people as concerned about the death of a black child as we are about the death of a black child? that is one of the fundamental issues that we still address. we have had situations where assault weapons are used on a weekly basis, a monthly basis and their urban areas and the victims are black children. >> host: 2,000 children, black children were murdered on the south side of chicago and a seems to have mattered more that they were killing each other than that they were children who were dead, and it doesn't seem to be the uproar in the country. in our community -- >> guest: but that's where we are as the nation. i think most americans, black and white, all races understand that we are not the equal nation that -- >> host: that we say we are. >> guest: that there is still a reluctance to address that issue and understand that part of it comes from the problem of school education as if white children are in inferior schools there is acti
murdered, yet we all see what happened in that tragedy at the sandy hook elementary school why were people moved by those children being murdered? >> guest: people are as concerned about the death of a black child and as they are about the death of a black child that is one of the fundamental issues that we still address. we have had situations where assault weapons are used on a weekly basis in their urban areas and the victims are children. >> host: 500 people in 2012 for murder, black people were murdered on the south side of chicago and seems to matter more that they are killing each other in their children are dead and it doesn't seem to be the uproar in the country even in our community about it. >> guest: but that's where we are as a nation. most americans black-and-white and of all races understand the we are not the equal nation that we say we are. but there's still a reluctance to address that issue and understand that part of it comes from if you put one of the laws of school education is that white children are an inferior schools. >> host: there's action. >> guest: there's act
this country and by local ymcas. in the aftermath of the enormous tragedy of sandy hook elementary school there's been an outpouring of bipartisan support for including the mental-health care system in this nation. in fact, the task force explicitly endorse mental-health first eight. is a common policy thread running through all these proposals in some sort of fashion they all endorse early detection of mental illness. you see mental-health first aid as part of the solution to the problems facing our country today. from a prevention standpoint. exactly what the program does. it permits us to intervene early, to help allies and say these individuals who are in desperate need and attentive basement of health services. last week representative ron barber introduced the mental-health first eight act of 2013, h.r. 274. and a reseller to vice president like, congressman barber wrote the holiday i urge you to endorse commonsense bipartisan proposals like the mental-health first eight act. we have failed to give the mental-health needs. we have paid too high a price for this neglect. everyday we see t
people feel like we have the economic prevalent of hurricane sandy. let the people are doing is here are some sandbags come here is an umbrella. do what we say and you will be fine. they are the ones selling of the umbrellas and the sandbags that say that you are going to be fine and. >> guest: she said she wouldn't go to the stock market herself and set up the money had navigator newsletter with a small mutual fund adviser getting amazing results allow easier to get great results when you are doing that. david ramsey has told people they could expect of% on their returns but they did that in 2012 that was one year. that isn't a number of people has ever gotten to the other thing that he's done which i find amazingly hurtful he is urging people not to declare bankruptcy and this is an important point you have to talk about those for a minute to beat bankruptcy access for a reason. you may not like it and no one wants to declare bankruptcy. we know the status and full of people riding of the credit cards and the bankruptcy and the startup businesses which is another number of debt tha
'll lee say for the past several years we went to the economic equivalent of hurricane sandy phase say put up the views and banks, here is an umbrella do as i say you will be fined and they still use the umbrella and and the sandbag. says norman who has said she will not go to the stock market has say many navigator was a small mutual-fund adviser who was getting amazing results turns out because he had a typographical error and misstated return numbers of the index. it is a lot easier to get great results when you do that. she was doing that. gave ramsey has told people to this day they could expect will% average annual returns in the markets and i guess they did get that in 2012 but that was one year but nobody has done that on a consistent basis. the other thing he has done is he is urging people not to declare bankruptcy. we do have to talk about this. bankruptcy exist for a reason. you may not like it, nobody wants to declare bankruptcy united states is not full of people who are running up their credit cards and then run into bankruptcy court. it is full of a lot of people who live i
car ride home lying down. not until we got to sandy and and he said you can get up now. just seeing the things outside the window was amazing. i remember the palm trees. we did not have those. the streets that seemed to never end and the buildings to reach this guy, it was amazing. really amazing. >>host: where did you live when you first got here? >>guest: first in l.a. i lived in highland park, northeast los angeles predominately latino. >>host: most the legal? >>guest: i think it was a combination. of lot of immigrant families also legal and illegal. >>host: how did the legal spew the illegals? >>guest: i am not too sure about that. as a child, i don't think i was too aware of that kind of response from the adults. but i do remember being shocked at school that most of the kids were turks skin and looked like me and have last names like garcia and could speak a language i could not speak. that was shocking because they looked exactly like me but they weren't. that was the first time i was really aware of the fact there were latinos but they were different from me. >>host: you wer
. they occur everywhereverywher e. they occur here in a very different way but after sandy you know i was paying very close attention but after the storm is coming up and you saw a lot of the same tropes coming up again. i fear for instance that in the wake of the storm there was going to be a wave of panic or go there was going to be looting and society was going to break down in the mob mentality would take over. people were out there looking for people, the media and people in disaster relief. officials were out there looking for any sign that they could find of society breaking down but the looters coming in and usually blowing it out of proportion. really while there were isolated incidents, as there are anywhere, it wasn't that big of a deal. now in katrina, more like haiti that attitude had major major ramifications. you end up with people innocent new orleanians who had survived the disaster and were just trying to stay alive, getting shot to death by the police because the police assumed that they were stealing something. so that's the long way of saying that it would have be
think i'm still here. [laughter] >> no way. >> i sort of feel like the rest of sandy koufax pitching staff. following these guys. but i did have the privilege and that jack well from several different perspectives. maybe just to relate a couple of them. first, as hanks said, i started as even more green. the front row can tell you. the atlanta constitution, when i was 21 years old in 1969. jack had just come out of the army. jack has started when he was 23 years old in 1952. these dates are kind of interesting because the book is called evolution of a southern reporter. at the word evolution is really an important part of the. jack was 23 years old. at 29 years old he won the pulitzer prize. in 1970. and 75, as has been mentioned, he went to the l.a. times. and in 70 he went to washington. the man. sixty-five. sixty-five. 6570. he was the gunmen during that time. he accomplished all of those wonderful stories. of course when i arrive there he was an atlanta. he was still based atlanta. he really wasn't in atlanta. he was traveling all over the place where the movement was at the time
the economic equivalent of hurricane sandy. what the people are doing is saying, hey, put up a few sandbags. here's an umbrella. do as i say. you'll be fine. better, they are selling you the umbrellas and sandbags they say are going to make you fine. >> host: any examples? >> guest: susie orman had a news letter with a small mutual fund adviser who was getting amazing results. one of the reasons they got the results was because he had a typographical error and misstated return numbers of the indexes. it's a lot easier to get, you know, great results when you do that. she was doing that, and dave ramsey told meme to this day to expect 11% returns in the market, and to be fair, they could get that in 2012, but that was one year. that's not a number people have ever gotten at any consistent basis, and, you know, the other thing he's done which is amazingly hurtful is he's urging people to not declare bankruptcy, and this is a really important point, and we have to talk about this for a minute. bankruptcy exists for a reason. you might not like it. it's not -- the world, despite what people thi
the victims of hurricane sandy. these were debated in the senate. we have to take prevent costumes and preventions before another hurricane sandy. thousands of homes and businesses were destroyed in new york, new jersey, and new england, and 10,000 americans were left homeless. we have a responsibility to rebuild their lives and their communities. as we have done with those who are victims of fire and other natural disasters and other parts of the nation. we will consider changes to the senate rules. because this is a matter of additional debate, we reserve the right of all senators to oppose changes to the senate rules. it is my intention that the senate rules are continued and allow these important rules discussion to continue. i'm hopeful am cautiously optimistic that the republicans and democrats can reach an agreement to manage the senate more effectively in coming months. >> republican leader? >> mr. president, i want to start by co want to start by congratulating president obama on his inauguration. presidential inauguration to always time for the country to come together. w
department for the extraordinary performance during and after superstorm sandy. what a sea change, no pun intended, from the response to katrina. before engaging in a conversation let me say word about one of the person who is supposed to be here. i'm not sure that she is here. is terry here? yes. i want to make a special shout out, whose mother was killed on 9/11, and whose voice and courage have inspired congress and me, and the executive branch, both in the bush administration and the obama administration, to act. she is the director of the bipartisan policy center's homeland security project, and her movie, killing in the name, did an extraordinary amount to expose the fact that much of al qaeda's poor is against in a sense muslims. there's lots of big shots and mission, and one of them, a great favorite of mine, bill webster just walked in, but weighing in at 100 pounds, carrie may actually be the heavyweight. so welcome, carrie. welcome to all of you, and welcome to janet napolitano. [applause] >> are you embarrassed? oh, good. that was my intention. okay, madam secretary, let's sta
, and record levels of damage from hurricane sandy. $70 billion, if we can't see the downside of spending that money and risking lives for all of the changes that are taking place to agricultural to our communities the ocean and so forth, we're just ignoring what science is telling us. i will be a passionate advocate about this. not based on ideology. based on facts and science. and i hope to sit with all of you and convince you the $6 trillion market is worth millions of american jobs and leadership. and we better go after it. >> thank you, mr. chairman. >> senator udall. >> thank you, mr. chairman. to my good friend, senator barrasso, wyoming is a producer state and new mexico is also a producer state. and i found the same experience that the senator kerry talked about in terms of massachusetts, in new mexico, the fastest growing sector in the renewable jobs. and so i think it's a big opportunity for us, we should be pursuing it. i grew with what he -- i agree with what he just said. hypo with can work with each other. we should try to pull together and discuss the facts and really pu
. they testified yesterday in response to the shootings at newtown sandy hook elementary school were a young man described as having mental issues guns down 26 people, including 20 children, with an assault rifle on september 14. the committee has not addressed the issue of mental health since 2007. spent my first order of business this morning is to extend a warm welcome to our communities -- committees new members. and a focal order, tammy baldwin, senator chris murphy, senator tim scott and senator elizabeth warren. this is a remarkably talented group of freshmen senatorscome and we're glad to have them onboard. i know that some are also over at the hearing on senator kerry's hearing to be secretary of state starting at the same time. i also want to salute our new ranking member, senator alexander. has long been a valuable member of this committee. i have appreciated my relationship with former ranking member center in c. i look for to the same kind of close collaboration and partnership with my good friend senator lamar alexander. today our committee will examine a range of issues running me
speeches followed at 4:30 with debate on a disaster aid spending bill for those affected by hurricane sandy. live gavel-to-gavel coverage here on c-span2. >> now, investment manager and former rick santorum supporter foster freiss reflecting on the 2012 presidential election, gay marriage and the future of the republican party. this event was hosted by the christian science monitor in washington d.c. [inaudible conversations] >> okay, here we go. i'm dave cook from the monitor. thanks for coming. our guest this morning is foster freiss who is visiting our fair city from his home in jackson, wyoming. he's accompanied by one of his advisers, matthew taylor. our guest was born in rice lake, wisconsin, and earned his degree in business administration at the university of wisconsin where he met his wife, lynn. he served two years as an army intelligence officer and then founded freiss associates, an investment firm whose brandywine fund was wildly successful. he sold controlling interest in the firm in 2001 but remains as chairman of freiss associates. in recent years he's focused on philanthrop
try to spend their money in a wiser, built-to-last kind of way. that's what the sandy supplemental allows. it also allows the state to draw down a portion of its hazard mitigation funding from fema in order to leverage mitigation opportunities earlier in the construction process. in the old days, it would take 18-36 months for funding to become available in some instances to rebuild a school. that's too long. can you imagine a community going three years, you know, without even getting their school started? i mean, i realize that sometimes it takes a long time to build things, but you don't want to just wait three years before you start. so the way that we do it now without spending any more money, it's just allowing them to -- the federal government to push out some of the front money to the locals, they can then get started and of course they will reimburse the federal government. so that is a very smart reform that's in there. in addition, we also provide grants on the basis of a reliable fixed estimate for expedited removal of storm debris. this approach will be faster, cheaper
colleagues, sandy grimes, another virginian, who worked with her on the ames task force stepped up to care for jean as she was battling cancer. sandy grimes, a career c.i.a. employee ultimately served as jean's primary caregiver. she sat with her each day during the final three months of her remarkable life. shimon toward jean's care and tried -- she monitored jean's care. she often brought personal messages of support and appreciation from the former c.i.a. colleagues. quote from ms. grimes, "i felt an obligation to be there with her. i can't imagine not doing it. i was the one jean would accept. i owed it to her as a friend." by all accounts, jean vertifay was an intensely private woman and she doubtless would recoil at the attention she is now receiving, but one cannot help but be inspired by this true-life story of service and patriotism and friendship demonstrated by these two great employees: sandy grimes and the late jean vertifay. their services reflect well on the work of thousands of other intelligence professionals whose names can never be revealed. both of them deserve our reco
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